China Starts 22-mile Bridge

July 15, 2003 · by DesignIntelligence

Work began last month on China's Hangzhou Bay Bridge-an ocean-spanning beast expected to cost $1.4 billion dollars and be the world's longest stayed-cable bridge.

Work began last month on China's Hangzhou Bay Bridge-an ocean-spanning beast expected to cost $1.4 billion dollars and be the world's longest stayed-cable bridge.

Construction for the six-lane, approximately 22.4-mile bridge should take five years, and it is expected to last a century. The area it will serve is the Yangtze River Delta, with a population of 135 million, including Shanghai and most of the country's wealthiest cities. The area also produces more than 20 percent of China's gross domestic products. The start and end cities are Cixi city at the South, reaching north to Jiaxing City. It will be designed for driving speeds of about 60 miles per hour. Groundbreaking ceremonies followed a decade of planning that involved hundreds of international experts. Considerations included huge tidal changes, difficult undersea soil and the impact of the region's rough weather and typhoons.

Also on the horizon is the opening of Shanghai's Yangshan deep-sea port, a $1.45 billion project scheduled to open in 2005.

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