KieranTimberlake's SmartWrap Getting Attention

August 15, 2003 · by DesignIntelligence

Imagine bricks and mortar being replaced by “smart” walls that are made of an ultra-thin polymer-based film—the same material used in a plastic soda bottle. And the technology used is applied by a printing process.

Solos is a series of exhibitions at the Cooper-Hewitt museum to showcase design work new to the market or in the research and development stage. The first, by KieranTimberlake Associates LLP will be on display until Oct. 10.

SmartWrap
Imagine bricks and mortar being replaced by “smart” walls that are made of an ultra-thin polymer-based film—the same material used in a plastic soda bottle. And the technology used is applied by a printing process. SmartWrap is a concept for a new building material that integrates the segregated functions of a conventional wall, like shelter and insulation, and compresses them into one composite film that can be erected in a fraction of ordinary building time.
SmartWrap incorporates emerging technologies in heating and cooling, visual display and lighting, and energy collection. The combined technologies are printed on a single micrometer-thin layer, replacing the bulky and separate functions of traditional construction with a thin film wrapped around a structural frame. Museum-goers will be able to input variables into a computer terminal to produce a customized design for the SmartWrap wall.

SmartWrap is made up of several layers including substrate, printed and laminated layers all roll-coated into a single composite film. Together, they can provide shelter, climate control, lighting and information display, and power.

To control temperature, SmartWrap contains micro-capsules of phase change materials embedded into a polymer resin then extruded into a film. The phase change materials provide latent heat storage for thermal moderation by absorbing, storing, or releasing heat as they change state.

To provide lighting and information display, SmartWrap uses Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED) technology. Organic molecules emit light (photons) when an electric current is applied. OLED technology is currently used in mobile phones and handheld computer devices.

Since buildings have large surface areas that are exposed to the sun,they are ideal solar collectors. Thin film silicon solar cells in the SmartWrap power the OLED technology. Thin film batteries store excess energy, and the conductive ink provides the conduit for the activation of these technologies.

www.cooperhewitt.org/SOLOS/index.html

Post Comment

Salvaging a Sustainable Future

Jul 23, 2014 · by Shannon Goodman

Building material salvage/reuse advances substantial economic and social benefits Read full »

Designing the Process of Leadership Transition

Jul 9, 2014 · by Bob Fisher

Few issues are as essential to the life of a firm as determining which leaders will shape the future of the organization. Read full »

New Project Delivery Method Emerging at GSA

Jun 11, 2014 · by Barbara Heller

The federal agency struggles to overcome challenges with a dwindling budget Read full »

Become More Business Intelligent

May 28, 2014 · by Michelle Cipollone

Analyzing data to measure performance, use goals in decision-making, and predict the impact of decisions on your firm Read full »

The Owners Dilemma

How Firms Succeed 5.0

Topics

DI.net RSS Feeds

DI.net on Twitter

Research Support